SAME DAY PIZZA DOUGH AND MAKING A TUNA PIZZA

SAME DAY PIZZA DOUGH - USING GAS-FIRED PIZZA OVEN WITH MOLINO GRASSI

This week I cooked another same day dough pizza but this time using the gas-fired pizza oven.  I wanted to show how differently the dough cooks compared to pizza dough that's had either a room proof, a cold proof or both.  With fresh dough I made just 4 hours earlier I found that:

  • it's harder to stretch.  
  • it's a lot easier to create holes in your dough.  
  • it sticks more than normal to the work surface when you stretch it.
  • it doesn't taste as good
  • the dough doesn't cook as well as proofed dough, in the oven.

Remarkably, the dough cooked much better in the gas than it did in the wood last week.  I had left the dough out for 40 minutes longer and even in that short time in my quite cold room, the dough was already more bubbly.  And this came out in the cook - there were more bubbles on the crust compared to the wood cook and the dough itself had risen more during the cook.  In this video, I compare the wood cook with the gas cook to show how different the two fuels cook the dough.  Using the Molino Grassi flour it can be seen that it cooked better with the gas oven.  The crust in the wood-fired oven became very crunchy and hard with very few bubbles.  It was as though the hydration levels in the dough weren't high enough even though it was a 60% hydration recipe.

So, my thoughts and overview of the cook are that I would not recommend using dough made just a few hours earlier if you want your pizza to be the best it can be!

My preferences are as follows:

  1. 24 hour room proof and 5 day cold proof then use/or freeze
  2. 24 hour room proof and 3 day cold-proof then/or freeze
  3. 24 hour room proof then use/or freeze

A year ago I wouldn't have made dough like this.  It's mostly down to trial and error that I'm using this process.  However, one of the viewers on my video last week mentioned that I should try cold-proofing the dough straight away and then giving it a room temperature rise before use.  I am definitely going to try this and I sort of did in my other pizza cook this week - the Tuna Pizza.

COOKING TUNA PIZZA IN THE WOOD-FIRED PIZZA OVEN

I was asked by a viewer to make a Tuna pizza and I couldn't wait to give it a try.  I honestly couldn't remember if I'd cooked tuna on pizza before - if I had it was a good while ago. Anyhow it was a really nice pizza to make and taste.  I topped this pizza with tuna, buffalo mozzarella, fried red onions, black olives, rocket and some garlic infused olive oil.  It was delicious and reminded me of a Pan Bagnat.

I have to admit that the dough I used for this pizza was one that I had treated rather badly.  I used a 24 hour room proof dough made with Blue Caputo 00 flour, that I'd cold-proofed for a few days then placed in the freezer all scrumpled up in a freezer bag.  I then part-defrosted the dough but it started to rain so I placed it back in the freezer.  A few days later I wanted to use it again and so defrosted it overnight before the cook.  I had no idea how it would turn out but I could see that there were lots of little bubbles and the consistency looked good to me so I used it.  I have to say that it stretched really well and gave a good cook on the crust too.  And this goes back to where I previously mentioned that I would reverse the dough process and cold-proof before the room-proof.  This wasn't far off that process in that the dough was cold then warmed up again.  And I would recommend giving it a try. 👍 

See you next week!

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CHORIZO AND PEPPERONI PIZZA

I'd like to start off this week with the words Article 13.  This was passed by the EU Parliament and will now be implemented across Europe and the UK within the next 2 years.  It is where information, music, pictures and videos will need to be checked and monitored for copyright before they are shared.  I'm worried about it because it has unintended consequences for creators who produce original content.  Those who passed this Article - now called Article 17 claimed it would not impact on but help small original creators.  Let's see how they think this Article can be implemented in a way that is not going to destroy all small creators.  We are listening, watching and waiting.

CHORIZO PIZZA

This cook took some time.  Probably one of the longest pizza cooks I've had.  I love using the Ooni 3 to cook pizza and I used the Gas to cook this Chorizo pizza.  The stone was a perfect temperature and everything was ready for the cook.  So, in the pizza went and immediately I could see the base cooking fast on the stone even though it was only 430c.  The top of the crust of the pizza was also getting hit by the strong flame so I turned it down to low.  The problem I had was that the side of the crust wasn't cooking fast, the base was and the flame was hitting the top of the crust.  So the mid crust part was not getting cooked.

 

So, with the gas on low and with the help of the pizza peel to protect the toppings the pizza was ready.  The peel protected the top whilst the side of the crust cooked.  Overall I'd say it took about 5 minutes in total to cook!  It tasted great, the chorizo was delicious and the base cooked really well.

PEPPERONI PIZZA

I love Pepperoni Pizza.  This video is Part 1 of 2.  I am experimenting with dough to show what the difference is between a long proofed dough and a freshly made dough.  I normally use dough that's had at least a 24 hour room proof.  The dough I used for this video was freshly made with just a 4 hour room temperature proof.

I used the Ooni Pro with real wood to make this pizza.  The dough cooked pretty well considering it hadn't had much time to work its magic and offered up a very tasty base for the pizza toppings.

The base cook was great.  I mean, if I made a base cook like that every time I made pizza I would be one very happy pizza maker!

So, what I wanted to show with this dough and the cook was that if you need to make dough on the same day as your pizza cook then go ahead.  You'll produce a lovely pizza.  But, for a better dough, try getting the dough made ahead of time.  You can do this by either freezing your longer proofed dough and defrosting it on the day you need it or make the dough 5 days, 3 days or the day before.  I think freezing your dough is the best option.  That 24 hour proof or 5 day long cold-proof does give the crust a better cook and provides a better flavour and makes it easier to stretch.

See you next week!

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Yellow Topped Pizza and Using a New Pizza Tool!

I fancied making a pizza with just one colour and for this week it was yellow.  I used some small yellow tomatoes with a sliced up yellow bell pepper.  The pepper was fried beforehand. So, this turned into a very fresh and tasty pizza that would be perfect for someone who loves yellow or just because it's a nice pizza to make.  The pizza was cooked using the Ooni 3 gas-fired pizza oven.

The Dough Recipe for this pizza was:

  • 500g Molino Grassi 00 Flour
  • 9g dissolved table salt
  • 3g yeast
  • 6 hour room temp proof
  • 5 day cold proof

I used the pizza dough option on my bread-maker

I think the Molino Grassi flour dough cooks really well under a gas flame and provides a great crust.  The stone was hot - about 460c in the middle - maybe I should have left it cool slightly down to 440c.  The base turned out well but I had to lift it off the stone a bit during the cook.

USING A NEW PIZZA TOOL!!

I had to get one of these tools.  I'd seen it on Amazon and wanted to give it a go with the dough.  I know that when I started making pizza I would have benefited from using this tool for times when things weren't going to plan.  My dough has improved since and I will continue hand-stretching with no tools.  However, back then when my dough wasn't so good I would have found this tool handy to save the day!  If you are a beginner pizza maker this tool may be useful at times but learning to stretch pizza dough by hand is definitely a better way to make great pizza!

The dough recipe for this Pizza:

  • 500g Blue Caputo Flour 00
  • 9g dissolved table salt
  • 0.2 g dissolved dry yeast
  • 300g water  (150g for the yeast, 150g for the salt)

Used the pizza dough option on the bread-maker machine.

  • 24 hour room temperature proof

The tomatoes and ham were so tasty on this cook.  The ham cooked wonderfully in the oven because the flames had given it a crispy edge.  The dough cooked really well giving the pizza a delicious crispy, bubbly crust.  The base of the pizza wasn't that great - it could have been better!  The temperature of the stone when the pizza went in was 440c in the middle which is normally good to go, but I think I should have let that increase to 450 to 460c.  The flame was very fierce at the back and yet the stone temperature right at the door was about 400c.  I kept the pizza away from the strong flames at the back but the base wasn't getting the 440c heat it needed.  If the flame at the back had been less fierce I would've moved the pizza up further into the oven and the base would have cooked just fine.

And that leads me on to one of the things I really love about the Ooni Pro - and that is the size of the oven.  You are able to move your pizza around to suit the flame cook - bring it forward - move it back.  This helps so much when you cook with real flames and gives you more control. 

See you soon!

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MEATBALL PIZZA AND BACON PIZZA COOKED IN A WOOD-FIRED PIZZA OVEN.

MEATBALL PIZZA - COMPARING A GAS COOK TO A WOOD FIRED COOK

We've been back to using the wood-fired oven this week and the dough suits it better.  I made the same Meatball Pizza as last week - using the same dough recipe and toppings.  In this video I cooked the Meatball Pizza in the wood-fired oven then added clips from the gas-fired oven Pizza to provide a visual comparison of the two cooks:

The outcome from the two differently cooked Pizzas shows that even with the same dough and toppings the gas and wood ovens do provide different results - but not huge ones.  The main difference I noticed was the top of the gas Pizza certainly had been cooked harder, whereas the wood-fired oven had cooked the top in a gentle and less vicious way (I had the gas power on full throttle to cook the crust)!

It also took a while for the gas to cook the dough on the crust and that was one of the reasons why I had to hold the peel over the toppings to protect them whilst the crust cooked.  My thoughts on this are that the dough I'm currently using has been tweaked to work well with a wood-fired flame.  For the gas I will recreate my older dough recipe using Molino Grassi and try again.

This was a delicious pizza and it cooked well.  The taste difference between the gas and wood is minimal.  There is a slight difference but it's very subtle.  I need to do a blind taste test experiment - that'll be interesting.  The wood-fired flame certainly brought the leoparding back to the crust.

BACON AND ONION PIZZA USING A WOOD-FIRED PIZZA OVEN

I made this Pizza on Friday in such a flurry because I only had 45 minutes to get the oven to temperature, make the pizza and cook it.  Why?  Rain.  The weather forecast had predicted just a 10% chance of rain.  And that was due to increase to 50% within the hour.  We've had so much bad weather - rain and strong winds practically every day that it's been impossible to get outdoors for a cook and so if there's a break in the cloud at this time of year - you've got to go for it!

It was a bit windy but overall this was a really good cook.  The bacon lardons together with the cooked and uncooked onions worked well together.

This was the first white pizza I'd cooked in a while and a nice change from a tomato based pizza.  The fried mushrooms together with the onions and bacon were perfect topping combinations.  Add some pine nuts and rocket leaves and you've made one tasty pizza!  The pine nuts roasted beautifully in the flames and provided the hidden crunch within each bite. Yum!

Back to the weather on this Pizza.  Within 5 minutes of finishing the cook, it poured down.  Big time.  I was lucky.  I'll put a video up to show what happens when it starts pouring with rain for more than an hour right onto your 600 centigrade wood-fired oven!

Hoping for better weather - see you next week!

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ANCHOVY PIZZA & CURRIED CHICKEN PIZZA USING WOOD AND GAS FIRED PIZZA OVENS.

OONI 3 GAS-FIRED PIZZA OVEN - ANCHOVY PIZZA

I love anchovies and particularly the way they crisp under the intense upper heat from the Ooni 3 gas-fired pizza oven.

Anchovies have a strong delicious salty taste so I kept the other toppings subtle and added some black olives, roughly chopped baby spinach - not to forget the buffalo mozzarella and the tomato sauce on the base!  Check it out!

This was a real-time cook and I had the gas on full power throughout just to ensure the crust cooked as fast as possible.  Why did I use the pizza peel to protect the toppings throughout the cook?  It was because my dough was taking longer to cook than the toppings and so if I hadn't covered the top it would have cooked within 60 seconds and the crusts would have been left pale and uncooked.  

I've been tweaking my current dough recipe to work well with wood-flames.  Over the last couple of weeks I'd used the Blue Caputo flour dough recipe in a gas-fired oven for the first time and hadn't realised how differently the dough would cook in a gas flame.  This is all I could do to stop it from burning on the top whilst I waited for my crusts to cook.  And it was fine - the pizza tasted delicious.  

In previous videos where the dough cooked really well with the gas flame I was using the Molino Grassi flour.  As you may know by now I love to experiment with dough etc.  I am going to recreate the Molino Dough recipe that I had used previously and make pizza using the Ooni 3 gas-burner.  I'll do that in the coming weeks....

CURRIED CHICKEN - OONI PRO WOOD-FIRED PIZZA OVEN

Back to wood-flames this time!  I used to think that cooking with wood would be more of a fiddle than cooking with gas.  Your hands (and clothes) do get grubby from the wood and lump-wood ash but other than that - setting up the oven and getting it to the right temperature isn't much more effort.  The gas is cleaner and you just switch it on and after 15 minutes - it's ready.  With the wood, it takes 1 minute to light the kindling and then 5 minutes for the kindling and the lump wood to take.  Then you put the log on and in 5-7 minutes the oven is ready.  So it takes about the same time.

When I started cooking pizza I never thought I would be able to cook with wood.  I'd never cooked with the fuel before and had no idea what to do.  I give huge thanks for the support from the viewers and subscribers who gave comments full of advice on the videos I made. They taught me how to cook with wood.  It's been totally invaluable and has definitely shortened my learning curve considerably.  If you are a newbie to wood-fired cooking you may find it helpful to check out the comments on the Ooni Pro videos uploaded from September 2018 when I had just started to use the Ooni Pro.  And if you have any comments or thoughts on cooking pizza with wood or gas then please leave them in the comments section below!

The Curried Chicken Pizza was very tasty and the colourful toppings looked as good as they tasted!  I'm using baby spinach as a topping here as it works really well with the curry.  When I make slow-cooked curries I always add a large handful of fresh spinach to it.  I am also using baby spinach on a lot of my pizzas at the moment to replace Basil.  Unfortunately, my house temperature (which isn't freezing!) gets low enough at times during the Winter to kill off my growing Basil.  It just droops, gets all floppy and withers away at this time of year. 

For this Pizza I used my standard wood-fired Blue Caputo dough recipe but changed the process slightly.  I left the dough to rise for 24 hours at room temperature and I also gave it a 24 hour cold-proof too.  This dough enjoyed that final proof.  But again it was so bubbly even though I had only put in 0.3 g of yeast!  So I need to lower that again to 0.2g and see if that does anything.

It's been a busy but a lovely and sunny week which was good as our family had been off for the half-term break!

See you next week!

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Cooking Meatball Pizzas using Ooni 3 and using All Purpose 00 Pizza Flour.

The weather is improving and it feels like Spring!  This week I had a little experiment using All Purpose 00 Pizza Flour.  I wanted to make a garlic bread and so opted not to use Caputo because it's so bubbly.  To tone the bubbles down for this type of bread I opted for the All Purpose.

When I started making Pizza I had no idea what 00 meant and the difference between All Purpose 00 and Caputo 00 flour.  One is totally stretchy and the other totally isn't.

  • 00 is the mill of the grain.  This is the finest milled grain.
  • The grain itself will determine how stretchy your dough will be.
  • Caputo 00 Flour uses soft grain - with a lovely protein balance to give that stretch you need to make pizza.
  • All Purpose 00 Flour uses harder grains and is great for making pasta.  This flour does not become stretchy in dough.

The All Purpose Flour didn't stretch as I'd expected.  I cold-proofed it for 4 days and so gave it optimum conditions for a good dough cook!  From the way it cooked I'd put far too much water in the recipe.  It was so sticky compared to the Caputo flour even though I'd used the same wood-fired pizza dough recipe.  So lessons learned from this - if you are using All Purpose 00 Flour to make pizza, maybe use less water than you would normally if you use soft-grain flour dough recipes!

For my next garlic bread or pizza bread type experiment, I'm going to use Molino Grassi 00 flour as I've used that before and it cooked really well.

MAKING TWO MEATBALL PIZZAS BUT I ONLY REALLY WANTED TO MAKE ONE!

Yeah - I only wanted to make one!  An hour before I made this Pizza I dashed out to my local homeware store and grabbed a new full bottle of propane patio gas.  Time to get the Ooni 3 Gas Burner out!  I hadn't used it for a while and have now realised that it's good practice to keep using the different fuels regularly.  Why?  Gas and wood cook Pizza very differently.  And I had pretty much forgotten my gas cooking technique.

The wood flame, whether it's from logs or wood pellets, cook pizza in a different way.  The gas took longer to cook my pizza crust with the dough that I am currently using for wood.  The outcome is the same - great tasting pizza but they do cook differently and it's handy to keep using both fuel options if you have them, regularly.

I hadn't used my gas Ooni 3 Pizza Oven since making the Not-so-Starry Pizza (that was a lot of fun!)

And so the reason why I ended up cooking two of them is that I burnt part of the top of the first pizza.  The Ooni 3 Pizza Oven is lower in height than the Ooni Pro and so the flames hit the top of the pizza and cook it very quickly.  My crusts were not cooking as fast and so the top and base of the pizza cooked quickly but the crust was still pale.  I put the gas on minimum to prevent the top cooking quickly but that did not help.

So for pizza number two, I went for it and pushed the gas to high heat for the whole cook to get the crust cooked.  This meant that I needed to use my pizza peel to protect the top throughout the cook.  It worked!  My crusts cooked better and the top didn't burn.  The base on the first cook looked better than the second.  Don't know why that happened as the stone was the same temperature.

I've been using the Ooni Pro a lot recently and the oven is a lot higher which means the flames don't reach the top of the pizza so fast.  So, not only do I need to keep using the gas regularly to keep familiar with the way it cooks, I need to keep using the Ooni 3 too because I forgot how quickly it cooks the tops of pizza!

So, to sum up this weeks cooking efforts - I had great fun using All Purpose 00 Flour but will keep that for my pasta dishes!  Getting the Ooni 3 Gas Burner out again and using it after a few months became more of a challenge than I had realised!  In the video above I said that I thought cooking with wood was easier now.  In hindsight it's probably the same, it's just that I'm used to cooking with wood more and got used to it!

See you next week!!

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LIGHTING THE OONI 3 AND MAKING BREAD IN THE OONI PRO PIZZA OVEN FOR THE FIRST TIME!

HEATING AND LIGHTING THE OONI 3 PIZZA OVEN

Thought it was time to bring the Ooni 3 Pizza Oven out again to show how I light it and heat it up with wood pellets.

There are many brands of wood pellets you can use for the oven.  I started off using Ooni wood pellets.  They are great quality pellets and produce vey little black soot in the oven.

However, once that big bag finished I found it more cost effective to move onto another brand called Balcas Brites.  These pellets do produce a lot more black soot in the oven but the cook time and heat intensity is the same so it was a compromise I was happy to make!

It took me a while to get a hang of using the wood pellets - especially when cooking in the wind.  I'd never previously cooked with wood pellets outside and it took a while for me to learn how to keep the pellets topped up on a breezy day.

I did buy a vessel  - a metal funnel - that I popped into the pellet holder to hold additional pellets.  This was useful to help keep the wood pellets topped up.  It saves you re-stocking every 5 minutes.  The only issue with the funnel I used were the air gaps between its round spout and the square pellet holder.

This did affect the cook somewhat as the air got sucked up slightly towards the spout rather than moving forward into the oven area.


 

MAKING BREAD FOR THE FIRST TIME IN THE OONI PRO PIZZA OVEN

For me, baking bread in the Ooni Pro Pizza Oven this week was one of the most challenging cooks I've attempted so far.  I had done some research to ready myself for this but many of the wood-fired bread cook pro's mentioned that it does take a lot of practice to get it right! My Panasonic bread-maker cooks me a lovely loaf of bread every week.

I alternate between wholemeal and white.  The white tends to rise better than the wholemeal and so for my first cook in the wood-fired oven, white became the safer choice.

So, I started the cook off with the normal white bread recipe I use in the Panasonic:

550g strong white bread flour, 1.5 tsps dissolved dry yeast, 1.5 tsps dissolved table salt and 360ml luke-warm water (I use that to dissolve the salt and yeast in separately).

The dough option on the bread-maker takes 2h 20 minutes and in that time it fully kneads the dough and also gives the dough it's first proof.

Once the dough was ready in the bread-maker I placed it in a banneton for the second proof.  I'd never used one of these before but my aim was for it to give the bread a nice, fancy circular rim pattern on the outside.

Due to bad weather outside which delayed the cook, the dough proofed in the banneton for 1 hr 30 minutes when my plan was to only allow it to proof for 50 minutes.  I didn't want it to double in size.  But over that time it did and if it hadn't been for the cling film tightly wrapped around the outside of the banneton it would have tripled in size!

I should have really and I mean really floured the banneton.  I sprinkled it which wasn't enough.  So the dough stuck to it like glue and now I can't get it off!  I pulled the sticky dough out of the banneton and moved it onto the floured wooden pizza peel with no fancy, circular lines!

I cut a cross into the top of the dough and placed it into the Ooni Pro Wood-fired Oven.

Before I started fiddling around with the dough, I had already heated the oven right up and was waiting for it to cool down to a stone temperature of 260 c.  The air temperature should be around 100c to 180c.  My air temperature was a bit low - about 120c and so it took longer to cook.  After about 12 minutes the oven had cooled down too much and so I had to add a few pieces of kindling to heat it back up a little without creating too much of a flame.

Adding the kindling worked a treat and the oven quickly finished off the bread in a few minutes and gave it a lovely brown wood-fired crust.

Overall, I was really pleased with the result.  The easiest part was creating the dough in the bread-maker and the hardest parts were waiting for the stone to get to the right temperature without the air temperature being too hot.  The other challenge was knowing when the bread was cooked inside.  I read somewhere to measure with a thermometer and if it hits 96 c inside then it's cooked! Yay!

WE HIT 1000 SUBS THIS WEEK!🥳

That's a big milestone for us and I want to thank each and every one of you who have supported the channel, watched our videos and subscribed!!  Also, thank you for the fantastic advice you have given me when my cooking has gone wrong (which seems to be more often than not at the moment - lol!) 🥳

Plus, the channel also got accepted onto the YouTube Partner Programme this week and so adverts will start to appear!  The channel really needs some funding to grow and to do bigger and better things! 👍

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