MAKING AND BAKING CIABATTA BREAD IN A WOOD FIRED OVEN PLUS COOKING A RED PEPPER PIZZA!

MAKING AND BAKING CIABATTA BREAD

I had a bit of a mini break last week because the weather was so fantastic - completely last minute idea but I'm back now and it's all go again!

I used the same dough from the ciabatta roll cook.  So let me explain what happened during the first cook.

I'd cooked this loaf just after I'd finished cooking the ciabatta rolls.  I added a few more pieces of lump wood just to keep the oven at a higher temperature for the cook.  The Ooni Pro isn't that insulated so the inside temperature lowers quickly in between cooks.  I waited until the oven had reduced to an air temperature of 250c.  I placed the ciabatta loaf to the front of the oven - well away from the hot coals at the back.  There was no flame and I was happy to leave the loaf to cook there in that position for 5 minutes and then returned to check on it.

What a mistake!  In that very short time, the heat coming off the lump wood was so intense it burnt the one side of the loaf.  There was no flame, just heat.

 

As you can see in the video, one side was perfectly cooked and the other was rather burnt! But I did use the loaf - it tasted great!

So, in order to redeem myself I had to try again and this time I placed the ciabatta dough in the fridge for a few days to cold-proof to provide the dough with an improved taste and texture.  I wasn't disappointed  - the dough improved considerably and you can see that in the bubbling and texture - the second attempt had an even bubbling throughout, compared to the first attempt, which had large bubbling at the top with more condensed bubbles at the bottom.

From my experience of cooking ciabatta with a wood-fired oven I would say that for me the harder part of the process was making and handling the very sticky ciabatta dough.  The cook in the wood-fired oven was the easier part!

RED PEPPER PIZZA

Continuing my theme of making one colour topped pizza I made a red pizza this time.  I used some delicious small red tomatoes off the vine together with some fried red pepper.  Just those two toppings with the mozzarella and the tomato sauce was delicious enough.  You may want to add some fresh basil or black olives to complete the pizza.  Yum.

I cooked this pizza using the gas-burner option with the Ooni 3 Pizza Oven.  I use the wood-fired oven a lot so when I move over to using gas it always challenges me a bit more!  It is such a different cook and I tend to take a lot longer to cook the pizza or I burn it more often using gas!  Anyhow, I've saved up my pennies and I'm going to invest in buying either the Ooni Koda Pizza Oven or the Pizzacraft's Pronto Pizza Oven.

I think it's worth it as I spend so much time cooking pizza in the garden!

See you next week!

Continue Reading

SAME DAY PIZZA DOUGH AND MAKING A TUNA PIZZA

SAME DAY PIZZA DOUGH - USING GAS-FIRED PIZZA OVEN WITH MOLINO GRASSI

This week I cooked another same day dough pizza but this time using the gas-fired pizza oven.  I wanted to show how differently the dough cooks compared to pizza dough that's had either a room proof, a cold proof or both.  With fresh dough I made just 4 hours earlier I found that:

  • it's harder to stretch.  
  • it's a lot easier to create holes in your dough.  
  • it sticks more than normal to the work surface when you stretch it.
  • it doesn't taste as good
  • the dough doesn't cook as well as proofed dough, in the oven.

Remarkably, the dough cooked much better in the gas than it did in the wood last week.  I had left the dough out for 40 minutes longer and even in that short time in my quite cold room, the dough was already more bubbly.  And this came out in the cook - there were more bubbles on the crust compared to the wood cook and the dough itself had risen more during the cook.  In this video, I compare the wood cook with the gas cook to show how different the two fuels cook the dough.  Using the Molino Grassi flour it can be seen that it cooked better with the gas oven.  The crust in the wood-fired oven became very crunchy and hard with very few bubbles.  It was as though the hydration levels in the dough weren't high enough even though it was a 60% hydration recipe.

So, my thoughts and overview of the cook are that I would not recommend using dough made just a few hours earlier if you want your pizza to be the best it can be!

My preferences are as follows:

  1. 24 hour room proof and 5 day cold proof then use/or freeze
  2. 24 hour room proof and 3 day cold-proof then use/or freeze
  3. 24 hour room proof then use/or freeze

A year ago I wouldn't have made dough like this.  It's mostly down to trial and error that I'm using this process.  However, one of the viewers on my video last week mentioned that I should try cold-proofing the dough straight away and then giving it a room temperature rise before use.  I am definitely going to try this and I sort of did in my other pizza cook this week - the Tuna Pizza.

COOKING TUNA PIZZA IN THE WOOD-FIRED PIZZA OVEN

I was asked by a viewer to make a Tuna pizza and I couldn't wait to give it a try.  I honestly couldn't remember if I'd cooked tuna on pizza before - if I had it was a good while ago. Anyhow it was a really nice pizza to make and taste.  I topped this pizza with tuna, buffalo mozzarella, fried red onions, black olives, rocket and some garlic infused olive oil.  It was delicious and reminded me of a Pan Bagnat.

I have to admit that the dough I used for this pizza was one that I had treated rather badly.  I used a 24 hour room proof dough made with Blue Caputo 00 flour, that I'd cold-proofed for a few days then placed in the freezer all scrumpled up in a freezer bag.  I then part-defrosted the dough but it started to rain so I placed it back in the freezer.  A few days later I wanted to use it again and so defrosted it overnight before the cook.  I had no idea how it would turn out but I could see that there were lots of little bubbles and the consistency looked good to me so I used it.  I have to say that it stretched really well and gave a good cook on the crust too.  And this goes back to where I previously mentioned that I would reverse the dough process and cold-proof before the room-proof.  This wasn't far off that process in that the dough was cold then warmed up again.  And I would recommend giving it a try. 👍 

See you next week!

Continue Reading

CHORIZO AND PEPPERONI PIZZA

I'd like to start off this week with the words Article 13.  This was passed by the EU Parliament and will now be implemented across Europe and the UK within the next 2 years.  It is where information, music, pictures and videos will need to be checked and monitored for copyright before they are shared.  I'm worried about it because it has unintended consequences for creators who produce original content.  Those who passed this Article - now called Article 17 claimed it would not impact on but help small original creators.  Let's see how they think this Article can be implemented in a way that is not going to destroy all small creators.  We are listening, watching and waiting.

CHORIZO PIZZA

This cook took some time.  Probably one of the longest pizza cooks I've had.  I love using the Ooni 3 to cook pizza and I used the Gas to cook this Chorizo pizza.  The stone was a perfect temperature and everything was ready for the cook.  So, in the pizza went and immediately I could see the base cooking fast on the stone even though it was only 430c.  The top of the crust of the pizza was also getting hit by the strong flame so I turned it down to low.  The problem I had was that the side of the crust wasn't cooking fast, the base was and the flame was hitting the top of the crust.  So the mid crust part was not getting cooked.

 

So, with the gas on low and with the help of the pizza peel to protect the toppings the pizza was ready.  The peel protected the top whilst the side of the crust cooked.  Overall I'd say it took about 5 minutes in total to cook!  It tasted great, the chorizo was delicious and the base cooked really well.

PEPPERONI PIZZA

I love Pepperoni Pizza.  This video is Part 1 of 2.  I am experimenting with dough to show what the difference is between a long proofed dough and a freshly made dough.  I normally use dough that's had at least a 24 hour room proof.  The dough I used for this video was freshly made with just a 4 hour room temperature proof.

I used the Ooni Pro with real wood to make this pizza.  The dough cooked pretty well considering it hadn't had much time to work its magic and offered up a very tasty base for the pizza toppings.

The base cook was great.  I mean, if I made a base cook like that every time I made pizza I would be one very happy pizza maker!

So, what I wanted to show with this dough and the cook was that if you need to make dough on the same day as your pizza cook then go ahead.  You'll produce a lovely pizza.  But, for a better dough, try getting the dough made ahead of time.  You can do this by either freezing your longer proofed dough and defrosting it on the day you need it or make the dough 5 days, 3 days or the day before.  I think freezing your dough is the best option.  That 24 hour proof or 5 day long cold-proof does give the crust a better cook and provides a better flavour and makes it easier to stretch.

See you next week!

Continue Reading
Close Menu